Vervet Monkeys

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The vervet monkey, or simply vervet, is an Old World monkey of the family Cercopithecidae native to Africa. The term “vervet” is also used to refer to all the members of the genus Chlorocebus.

The five distinct subspecies can be found mostly throughout Southern Africa and commonly found on Sibuya Game Reserve, as well as some of the eastern countries.

Vervets live in social groups ranging from 10 to 70 individuals, with males changing groups at the time of sexual maturity.  The most significant studies done on vervet monkeys involve their communication and alarm calls, specifically in regard to kin and group recognition and particular predator sightings.

The vervet monkey resembles very much like a gray langur, having a black face with a white fringe of hair, while the overall hair color is mostly grizzled-grey. Male hierarchies are determined by age, tenure in the group, fighting abilities, and allies, while female hierarchies are dependent on maternal social status.

The vervet monkey eats a primarily herbivorous diet, living mostly on wild fruits, flowers, leaves, seeds, and seed pods. In agricultural areas, vervets become problem animals, as they will raid bean crops, peas, young tobacco plants, vegetables, fruit, and various grain crops. Carnivorous aspects of their diet include grasshoppers and termites. Raids of cattle egrets and weaver bird nests have been observed where the vervets will eat the eggs and chicks.