Bird Watching on Sibuya

Bird Watching Birding Sibuya Game Reserve

As a result of the extremely wet Spring, there are a good variety of aquatic birds in the reserve enjoying the large expanses of water and abundant supply of food.

Following are a few captured on camera while going about their business.

A Three - banded Plover chick ... Will I ever grow into these legs?
A Three - banded Plover chick ... Will I ever grow into these legs?

A Red-billed Teal and chicks find a tranquil pool
A Red-billed Teal and chicks find a tranquil pool

A pair of Cape Shovelers on the move
A pair of Cape Shovelers on the move

A handsome pair of Black Crakes
A handsome pair of Black Crakes

Sadly this year we've seen only the odd single EUROPEAN ROLLER (Coracias garrulus) and one solitary WHITE STORK (Ciconia ciconia)...their diminishing numbers have been a concern for the last couple of years.

A European Roller pauses on a high vantage point
A European Roller pauses on a high vantage point

An Osprey takes time out from fishing
An Osprey takes time out from fishing

The juvenile BATELEURS (Terathopius ecaudatus) unfortunately seem to have moved away during the last couple of months. A great pity as we were hoping that they were a young pair who would stay and possibly breed. Good news is that Justin spotted an adult bird scanning the Watersmeet Plains. We are hoping that Bateleurs might still return permanently to this area as this is the third individual sighted at SIBUYA in the last year.

Two OSPREY (Pandion haliaetus) have been sighted regularly hunting along the estuary. As they are rather uncommon Palaearctic migrants, visitors have been thrilled by their presence.

There have also been several sightings by both Chris and Werner of a BLACK STORK (Ciconia nigra)...as they are a rather rare sight, we are delighted that they are around!

A small group of "Twitcher" (birding fanatic) guests at SIBUYA were rewarded by seeing a WHITE-BACKED NIGHT HERON (Gorsachius leuconotus) while cruising quietly down the river one evening, This shy and uncommon resident is often overlooked as it hides in the thick undergrowth along parts of the River and requires the sharpest of eyes to spot it!

The immature African Fish-Eagle | A shy juvenile White-Backed Night Heron
The immature African Fish-Eagle | A shy juvenile White-Backed Night Heron



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