Sightings of Interest

African Safari Bird Watching Birding

Two pairs of visiting waders, both fairly rarely seen even slightly inland, were spotted by Chris and guests during early December: BAR-TAILED GODWITS (Limosa lapponica) and RUDDY TURNSTONES (Arenaria interpres) were a great sighting.


A pair of Ruddy Turnstones

Providing “Aaaaah!” moments were a set of twin NYALA (Tragelaphus angasii) babies born in the bush at River Camp…. great photo opportunities for the guests arose as they became habituated to Camp life fairly quickly and frequently appeared for ‘photo-shoots’.

The albino BLESBUCK (Damaliscus dorcas phillipsi)) on the plains of Edendale has produced a baby and those who bet that it would also be white, have won! It seems that it’s aware of its vulnerability because of its colour and flees at the slightest approach.


The shy albino Blesbuck

The COMMON OSTRICH (Struthio camelus) news isn’t great… sadly there is only one sub-adult left from the brood on the Edendale Plains and the nest that was being carefully tended by a male ostrich, has been abandoned. So no new chicks are to be expected at the moment.


Abandoned Ostrich nest

Chris and guests have had spectacular bird sightings lately… seventeen different species in ONE tree…a giant FICUS laden with fruit…what a bonus!


Trumpeter Hornbill feasting

Another group out with Chris were lucky enough to photograph a pair of AFRICAN PYGMY KINGFISHERS (Ispidina picta) taking turns at feeding insects to their young. The nest was in an AARDVARK (Orycteropus afer) hole in a termite mound. Lucky that no hungry little MONGOOSE or GENET feasted on the chicks.


Pygmy Kingfisher with a grasshoper

The shrinking flood-plain waters in LONG CAMP have attracted four large glossy BLACK STORKS (Ciconia nigra) which are an uncommon species but a delight to see with their long red legs as they stride through the murky water!


Black Stork looking for lunch



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